Philippa Browning

University of Manchester

Philippa Browning

Philippa Browning is a Professor in the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics. Her research interests are mainly in the physics of plasmas in the solar atmosphere, with application to explaining the high temperature of the solar corona, how solar flares work, and the fundamental process of magnetic reconnection. She is also interested in magnetic reconnection in young stars and magnetically-confined fusion plasmas. 

Erminia Calabrese

Cardiff University

Erminia Calabrese

Erminia Calabrese is an STFC Ernest Rutherford Fellow and Lecturer at the School of Physics and Astronomy of Cardiff University. She obtained her PhD in Rome at Sapienza University and then moved to the UK in 2011. She spent 4 years in Oxford as postdoctoral research associate and Beecroft Fellow, moved to Princeton University during fall and winter 2015/2016 as Spitzer Fellow and then back to Oxford to start the Rutherford Fellowship. In May 2017 she moved to Cardiff University to join the Astronomy Instrumentation and Astronomy & Astrophysics groups. Dr Calabrese works at the intersection of cosmological theory and data analysis of the Cosmic Microwave Background signals, and combines the CMB with galaxy surveys to obtain state-of-the-art constraints on cosmological scenarios, including limits on neutrino physics, dark energy and inflation. She also works on the modelling of secondary CMB emissions (e.g., thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effects) and extra-galactic sources present in CMB data, with the aim of obtaining unbiased cosmology and interesting astrophysics. She is an active member of the Planck satellite and Atacama Cosmology Telescope collaborations and of many other future CMB and galaxy experiments.

Charles Cockell

University of Edinburgh

Charles Cockell

Charles Cockell is Professor of Astrobiology at the University of Edinburgh. His academic interests involve life in extreme environments and the habitability and exploration of extraterrestrial environments.

He is author of the undergraduate text book, ‘Astrobiology: Understanding Life in the Universe’ published by Wiley-Blackwell.

Philip Diamond

Square Kilometre Array

Phil Diamond

Professor Philip Diamond is the Director-General of the SKA Project. He was appointed to this position in October 2012, and is responsible for the team designing and ultimately constructing and operating the SKA, which, when completed, will be the largest scientific project on Earth.

Helen Fraser

Open University

Helen Fraser

Dr Helen Fraser is a Senior Lecturer in Astronomy at the Open University where she leads the Astrochemisty Group. She graduated from Manchester at the height of the 1990's music scene with a BSc (Joint Honours) Physics and Chemistry, before completing her PhD (in Physical Chemistry) at Cambridge University. Her interests span "all things ice", looking at how solid state materials play a role in the processes of star and planet formation. Her research group combine laboratory experiments with major facilities use, such as microgravity environments and neutron scattering, to understand the roll of ice in interstellar chemistry and planet forming collisions.They have also uniquely developed slitless-spectroscopy techniques for mapping the distribution of condensed matter materials in star-forming regions, and  exploit molecular dynamics simulations to understand the physical chemical properties of ice in space.

She is currently Vice President (and President elect) of the IAU Commission on Laboratory Astrophysics, and a member of the European Space Sciences Board (ESSC). She is Vice Chair of both the Solar System Advisory Panel of STFC and the Space Policy Advisory Board of UK Space Agency. She really enjoys communicating science to the public - often through appearances on BBc 5 Live (most recently with Nicki Cambell) and more 'high brow' Radio 4 programmes, as well as BBC News and Science programmes. She has recently been involved in Aleksandra Mirs Space Tapestry exhibition at Liverpool Tate and Oxford Gallery of Modern Art, and was on of the production team on the "60 Second Adventures in Microgravity" [check out You Tube] series, voiced by David Mitchell. When not doing "ice", Helen is a qualified scuba diving instructor and can be found tagging sharks, a love of an animal she has passed to her son - who also takes up alot of her time. She somehow fits in singing in a choir, swimming and being a member of a book group - and now she is officially "middle aged" even enjoys gardening! Who knows - there may just be a planet out there just like our own where plant and bug life is equally the bain of alien gardeners!

Martin Hendry

University of Glasgow

Martin Hendry

Martin Hendry is Professor of Gravitational Astrophysics and Cosmology at the University of Glasgow, where he is also currently Head of School.  He is a member of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration that reported the first ever direct detections of gravitational waves in 2016, and he currently chairs the LSC Education and Public Outreach Working Group.  His main research interests are in multi-messenger astronomy and cosmology, investigating optimal methods for combining gravitational-wave and electromagnetic data to study the merger of compact binaries and other high-energy astrophysical sources.

Evan Keane

Square Kilometre Array

Evan Keane

Evan Keane is currently working in the role of Project Scientist for the SKA Organisation. He obtained his undergraduate degree (Physics & Astronomy) at NUI Galway and his Masters at DAMTP in Cambridge (Mathematics). He then went on to do his PhD at Jodrell Bank (Thesis: "The Transient Radio Sky"). Evan then moved to Bonn to work as a postdoctoral researcher. This was followed by a CAASTRO Senior Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, where he was the CAASTRO Dynamic Theme Scientist. 

Jane Greaves

Cardiff University

Jane Greaves

I obtained my PhD in 1990 from QMUL, and then worked for several years as an instrument/project scientist in Edinburgh and Hawaii. After a trio of research fellowships, my first permanent post began in in 2005 at the University of St. Andrews, and I moved to Cardiff University in 2015. I am best known for discovering and imaging comet belts around nearby stars - a topic that has taken a lot of patience since its emergence in the 1990s!

Minnie Mao

University of Manchester

Minnie Mao

Minnie is currently a Marie Sklowdowska-Curie Fellow at the Jodrell Bank Observatory. Prior to this she was a Support Scientist at JIVE and a VLA Postdoctoral Fellow at the NRAO. Minnie did her PhD at the University of Tasmania where she studied how galaxies form and evolve with cosmic time. Her current project is titled 'Here Be Spiral DRAGNs'. Spiral DRAGNs are spiral galaxies that play host to Double Radio Sources Associated with Galactic Nuclei (DRAGNs). Standard galaxy formation models require a major merger to trigger a DRAGN, which spiral galaxies cannot withstand. DRAGNs are almost always hosted by elliptical galaxies. Yet to date, a handful of spiral DRAGNs have been discovered. The existence of spiral DRAGNs is baffling and fuels Minnie's curiosity on a daily basis. When not studying spiral DRAGNs, Minnie enjoys hanging out with fish and eating chocolate. 

Carole Mundell

University of Bath

Carole Mundell - © IDPS, University of Bath
© IDPS, University of Bath

Carole Mundell is Professor of Extragalactic Astronomy and Head of Physics at the University of Bath. After reading Physics and Astronomy at University of Glasgow, she moved to the University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory for her PhD, followed by a research fellowship, on the dynamics of active galaxies. She spent two years in the USA as research associate at the University of Maryland, College Park, before returning to the UK in 1999, bringing a Royal Society University Research Fellowship to the Astrophysics Research Institute at Liverpool John Moore's University. Here, she diversified her research interests to include Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and developed the Liverpool GRB group. In recognition of this, in 2005 she was awarded a Research Councils UK Academic Fellowship and in 2007 became Professor of Extragalactic Astronomy. In that same year, her team won the Times Higher Research Project of the Year award for 'Measuring Gamma Ray Bursts', and in 2011, she won a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award for the study of 'Black-hole Driven Explosions and the Dynamic Universe'. Her team went onto further success winning the Vice-chancellor's medal for Research Scholarship and Knowledge Transfer in 2014. In 2015, Carole was appointed Head of Astrophysics at the University of Bath to establish a new astrophysics research group and undergraduate programme. In 2016, she was named FDM Everywoman in Technology Woman of the Year and was appointed Head of the Department of Physics at the University of Bath.

Mark Sargent

University of Sussex

Mark Sargent

Mark Sargent completed his undergraduate and PhD studies at the ETH Zurich in Switzerland. After postdoctoral positions at the Max-Planck-Institut for Astronomy in Heidelberg and at CEA Saclay (Paris), he moved to the UK in 2013 and is currently Senior Lecturer and Royal Society Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Physics & Astronomy of the University of Sussex in Brighton.


Mark's research focuses on understanding the star-formation process and the gas supply cycle for both nearby and high-redshift galaxies.

Anna Scaife

University of Manchester

Anna Scaife

Anna is a Professor of Astrophysics and head of the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics’ Interferometry Centre of Excellence at the University of Manchester. She holds a European Research Council Fellowship, which funds her group's work investigating the origin and evolution of large-scale cosmic magnetic fields. 

In addition, she holds a number of other grants which support technical radio astronomy research and development as part of the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project. Anna leads the SKA Imaging Pipeline development for this high profile Big Data project as well as playing an active role in defining its scientific direction. In 2014, Anna was honoured by the World Economic Forum as one of thirty scientists under the age of 40 selected for their contributions to advancing the frontiers of science, engineering or technology in areas of high societal impact.

▲ Up to the top